A pious homage to the victims of Bolshevism …

A pious homage to the victims of Bolshevism …

April 1, 1941: The massacre from Fântâna-Albă(White Fountain): approx. 2500 Romanian citizens, who wanted to cross peaceful the border into Romania, were killed by soldiers of the Red Army.
A romanian Katyn…

On April 1, 1941 a large group of people from several villages in the valley of Siret (Pătrăuţii de Sus, Pătrăuţii de Jos, Cupca, Corceşti, Suceveni) ,bearing a white flag and religious symbols (icons, lobe and crosses) , formed a column of over 3,000 peaceful people and went to the new Soviet- Romanian border. At about 3 km from the Romanian borde, Soviet border guards have ordered to stop. After the column ignored the order, the Soviets shot with machineguns directly in the moving group. Survivors were followed by cavalry and slashed with the swords…
After the massacre the wounded were tied to the tails of horses and dragged to 5 mass graves, dug in advance , where they were buried , some of them still alive: the elderly, women, children- alive, dead or wounded. Two days and two nights the earth moved in those graves gave until they were all dead…
Some ” lucky ” were arrested by the NKVD in Hliboca ( Adâncata ) and after horrendous torture, were taken to the hebrew cemetery in that town and cast alive into a mass grave, over which was poured and faded lime .

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Romania-minority compatriots

I dedicate this post to my good friend Theodor-Peter  Tencalec belonging of thish people.

                   Ruthenians

The English language exonyms Ruthenian, Ruthene or Rusyn (Russian: Русины, Rusyny; Ukrainian: Русини/Руські, Rusyny/Rus’ki; Belarusian: Русіны, Rusyn: Русины, Rusyny) have been applied to various East Slavic peoples.
Ruthenian is a historical term for ethnic minority in Poland, Slovakia, Romania, Serbia, Croatia, Hungary and the Czech lands.
In its narrower senses, Ruthenian is an exonym for ethnic Rusyns and/or inhabitants of a cross-border region around the northern Carpathian Mountains, including western Ukraine (especially Zakarpattia Oblast; part of historic Carpathian Ruthenia), eastern Slovakia and southern Poland.     This area coincides, to a large degree, with a region sometimes known in English as Galicia (Ukrainian: Галичина, Halychyna; Polish: Galicja and; Slovak: Halič). The name Ruthenian is also used by the Pannonian Rusyn minority in Serbia and Croatia, as well as Rusyn émigrés outside Europe (especially members of the Ruthenian Catholic Church). In contrast, the Rusyns of Romania are more likely to identify as “Ukrainian”.
During the early modern era, the term was used primarily in reference to members of East Slavic minorities in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, namely Ukrainians and Rusyns.
With the emergence of Ukrainian nationalism, during the mid-19th Century, there was a decline in use of the term Ruthenian as an endonym by Ukrainians, and it fell out of use in eastern and central Ukraine. Most people in the western region of Ukraine later followed suit later in the 19th century.
In the Interbellum period of the 20th century, the term Ruthenian was also applied to people from the Kresy Wschodnie in the Second Polish Republic.

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Medieval Kingdom of Kievan Rus’

 

                              Etymology

 

The ethnonyms Ruthene and Ruthenian share their etymological origins in the Rus’ people, as does “Russian”. However, it has never included more than a small minority of Russians.
Ruthenian and Ruthene were originally Latinised exonyms, based on the endonymic term Rusyn an ethnonym applied to peoples speaking the eastern Slavic languages in the broad cultural and ethnic region of Rus’ (Русь), especially the medieval kingdom of Kievan Rus’ and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.With borders that varied greatly over time, they inhabited the area that is now Belarus, Ukraine, and parts of eastern Slovakia, southern Poland, and western Russia, especially the area around Bryansk, Smolensk, Velizh and Vyazma.
Later “Ruthenians” or “Ruthenes” were used as a generic term for Greek Catholic, who inhabited Galicia and adjoining territories until the early twentieth-century; this group spoke Western dialects of the Ukrainian language and called themselves Русины, Rusyns (Carpatho-Russians).
The language these “Ruthenians” or “Ruthenes” spoke was also called the “Ruthenian language”; the name Ukrajins’ka mova (“Ukrainian language”) became accepted by much of the Ukrainian literary class only in the early twentieth-century in Austro-Hungarian Galicia. After the dissolution of Austria-Hungary in 1918 the term “Ukrainian” was usually applied to all Ukrainian-speaking inhabitants of Galicia

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Ruthenians in Austro-Hungary (light green)

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Ruthenians of Carpathians, Galicia, and Podole

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Ruthenians of Chelm, today in Poland

 

                         Belarusians

After World War II, many Belarusians from the Eastern Borderlands (Kresy) region of pre–World War II Poland found themselves in displaced persons camps in the Western occupation zones of the post-war Germany. At that time, the notion of a Belarusian nation met with little recognition in the West[citation needed]. Therefore, to avoid confusion with the term “Russian” and hence “repatriation” to the Soviet Union, the terms White Ruthenian, Whiteruthenian, and Krivian were used[citation needed]. The last of these terms derives from the name of an old Eastern Slavic tribe called the Krivichs, who used to inhabit the territory of Belarus.

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German map of 1930, now instead of Ruthenian the territory is split to Ukrainian and Belarusian

                           Autonomy

Ruthenians who still identify under the Rusyn ethnonym consider themselves to be a national and linguistic group separate from Ukrainians and Belarusians.